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2021 Spring

COMPOSITION I - COM101/2 Spring 2021


Course
Joshua Hayden
For information about registration please contact our admissions.

Text of syllabus with schedule, due dates, assignments and class policies.

Spring 2021 Syllabus: /files/6204760/S21_COM_101_Syllabus_Hayden.pdf

 

Course Schedule including due dates:

Date

Topic

Weekly Responsibilities:

8 Feb

Lesson 1

Topic: Course introduction, academic expectations, critical reading

Description: We will introduce the topics of this course along with the academic expectations, both for students and professor. We will explore the connection between critical reading and effective writing and set up the reading groups that will convene for discussion throughout the course.

 

Due before class meeting:

-Watch course introduction video

-Post your introduction video on NEO

Live class meeting:

-Questions about syllabus

-Discussion on Nancy Mairs essay “Disability”

-Active reading framework application

Assignment (after meeting):

-Watch video on time management strategies

-Discussion forum: time management practical ideas for writing

 

15 Feb

Lesson 2

 Topic: Introduction to the Writing Process and Methods of Writing

Description: We will break down the parts of the writing process and examine each part, critiquing examples and looking ahead to various assignments as they will encounter them at AAU. We will preview the various methods we will explore in this course and discuss the writing assignments.

 

Due before class meeting:

-Read: Brief Bedford Reader, chapter 2 “The Writing Process” on NEO

-Complete online part of class on the writing process

Live class meeting:

-Discussion on audience analysis, purpose and thesis crafting

-Peer activity and freewriting

Assignment (after meeting):

-Critical Reading Paper

22 Feb

Lesson 3

Topic: Narration and Description in Academic writing

Description: We will hold a reading group discussion on The Lottery exploring the story critically and making connections to our experience Diving deeper into using good stories and illustrations in your writing, we will use our personal narratives to compile strategies of effective narrative writing. We will begin to cover grammar in the context of your writing and focus in this session on sentence structure and verbs.

 

Due before class meeting:

- Critical Reading Paper due

- Read: Brief Bedford Reader, chapter 3 “Narration”

-Read or listen to Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery”

-Short quiz on the Lottery

-Apply the critical thinking framework to The Lottery

Live class meeting:

-Group discussions on the Lottery style and themes

-What makes a great story? How do you use it in academic writing?

Assignment (after meeting):

-Critical Analysis Paper on Shirley Jackson’s The Lottery

1 March

Lesson 4

Topic: Example & Professional Language

Description: With our special guest from AAU Career Services we will discuss how to write an effective cover letter and the use of examples in professional writing. For much of your college career, academic writing will seek to instill professionalism and we will practice identifying unprofessional, or overly colloquial language, in our communication.

 

Due before class meeting:

- Critical Analysis Paper on The Lottery

- Complete online module on example method of writing

-Watch video from Career Services and complete activities

Live class meeting:

-Discussion and activities on professional language, communication and cover letters

Assignment (after meeting):

-Professional cover letter assignment

8 March

Lesson 5

Topic: Compare and Contrast; sentence variety and parallelism

Description: We will take time to discuss De Botton’s essay as an example of compare and contrast writing method. In-class workshop on compare and contrast composition will involve peer critique and feedback. We will discuss the many applications of compare and contrast in academic writing and evaluate our own use of sentence variety and parallelism.

 

Due before class meeting:

-Professional cover letter due

- Read “Brief Bedford Reader, chapter 6 “Comparison and Contrast” with De Botton’s essay “Tragedy” (at the end of chapter PDF)

Live class meeting:

-Discussion on themes and method of de Botton

-Application of sentence variety and parallelism

Assignment (after meeting):

- Compare and Contrast Critical Evaluative Essay (On De Botton’s “Tragedy”)

15 March

Lesson 6

Topic: The Research Process; formulating a topic and research question, using library resources, getting organized

 

Description: Explanation and demonstration of the research process from generating a topic, narrowing a focus, finding sources, evaluating sources, organizing and structuring an argument. We will introduce your research assignment, due in several weeks, that we will be building and applying new methods to, step by step.

 

Due before class meeting:

-Compare and Contrast Evaluative Essay on Tragedy due

- Read: Brief Bedford Reader, “Appendix: Finding and Documenting Sources” on NEO

-Online class activities on the research process

Live class meeting:

-Activities on evaluating sources

-Application discussion on the research process and argumentative research paper assignment

Assignment (after meeting):

-Decide and report on your research topic in discussion forum

22 March

Lesson 7

Topic: Classification, literature reviews (scholarly sources)

Description: Discussion and application of classification as a writing approach and build a basic understanding of literature reviews and the structure of research articles. We will cover how to evaluate and use research articles as support for reasoning in a persuasive research paper.

 

Due before class meeting:

-Read: Brief Bedford Reader, chapter 9 “Classification”

-Complete online activities and bring an example of a scholarly article and a popular article that applies to your research topic

-Read Lutz’s essay “The World of Doublespeak”

Live class meeting:

-Discussion and application of classification method to literature reviews and other forms of academic writing

Assignment (after meeting):

-Scholarly article classification assignment

29 March

Lesson 8

Topic: Definition; Revision and Editing

Description: We will discuss and share our writing on the use of definition in the short essays on privilege. Continuing our unit on revision and editing, we will focus on thesis clarification, supporting with evidence and research paper structure.

 

Due before class meeting:

- Scholarly article classification assignment due

-Read: Brief Bedford Reader, chapter 11 “Definition” on NEO

Live class meeting:

-Freewriting exercise with pair discussions and application

-Discussion of definition method and expectations for definition paper

Assignment (after meeting):

-Research definition paper (APA format)

5 April midterm break

Midterm Break

Work on next online lesson

12 April

Lesson 9

Topic: Cause and Effect Description: We will use Havel’s letter to understand cause and effect composition. Our reading group will discuss this important letter in 20th Century Czech history and why it was significant in galvanizing an underground audience. We will also discuss and share our writing on the use of definition in the short essays on privilege. We will evaluate our outlines for the research paper and the revision and editing process.

 

 

Due before class meeting:

-Research definition paper due

-Read: Brief Bedford Reader, chapter 10 “Cause and Effect” introduction;

-Read: Václav Havel’s Letter to Dr. Husak (abridged) and complete online module connecting context to Havel’s method

Live class meeting:

-Discussion of Havel’s letter to Husak and cause and effect as a rhetorical method

Assignment (after meeting):

-Response activity to Havel’s letter and its relevance today

19 April

Lesson 10

Topic: Argument and Persuasion I

Description: Together we will analyze written and oral arguments and discuss the core principles and properties of argument. We will cover critical thinking questions about the conclusion, reasons, and assumptions of arguments. The argumentative essays we will critique focus on privacy and technology.

 

Due before class meeting:

-Response to Havel due

-Online portion of class on argument and persuasion

-Read Martin Luther King’s “Letter From a Birmingham Jail”

-Read: Brief Bedford Reader, chapter 12 “Argument and Persuasion”

Live class meeting:

-Discussion about argument and King’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail

Assignment (after meeting):

-Outline of Argumentative Research Paper (organizing)

-Upload video presenting your topic, thesis and support

26 April

Lesson 11

Topic: Argument and Persuasion II

Description: In this session we will focus on research-based arguments and the practice of counter-argumentation as a method of persuasion. We will explore the question, “How do you challenge someone’s thinking or change their mind about an issue?”

Due before class meeting:

-Outline of Argumentative Research Paper due

-Upload video of presentation for research paper due

-Complete online portion of class on counter-argumentation, logic and persuasion

-Read Chavez essay “Supporting Family Values”

Live class discussion:

-Discussion of Chavez essay “Supporting Family Values”

-Research counter-argument activity in pairs

Assignment (after meeting):

- Rough Draft of Argumentative Research Paper

3 May

Lesson 12

Topic: Logical Fallacies in Arguments

Description: We will cover critical thinking questions about the conclusion, reasons, and assumptions of arguments and some of the most common logical fallacies and how they show up in human discourse. We will discuss the common logical fallacies including Ad Hominem, straw person, false dilemma, emotional appeals, appeal to authority, and slippery slope.

 

Due before class meeting:

-Rough Draft of Argumentative Research Paper due

-Read: Asking the Right Questions, chapter 6 “Are there fallacies in the reasoning?”

-Complete online application activity on logical fallacy

-Complete quiz on logical fallacies

Live class meeting:

-Discussion on applying knowledge of logical fallacies to your own arguments

-Questions about format and feedback for final paper submission

Assignment (after meeting):

-Final Draft of Argumentative Research Paper

10 May

Lesson 13

Topic: Putting the Methods Together

Description: Examining sample essays that combine the methods we have been applying, we will discuss the nuances of audience analysis and combining methods. Using in-class writing prompts, we will apply multiple methods to various writing situations and scenarios.

 

Due before class meeting:

-Final Draft of Argumentative Research Paper

-Read: Brief Bedford Reader Part 3: “Mixing the Methods”

Live class meeting:

-Discussion on Mixing the methods

Assignment (after meeting):

-Review methods cover in class

17 May

Final Exam

Topic: Final Exam Essay

Description: The final exam will be a critical essay response to a short reading. A study guide will be provided in subsequent classes for student to review and prepare.

 

Due before class meeting:

-Complete online review and quiz on class methods covered

Live class meeting:

-Review for final exam

Assignment (after meeting):

-Complete final exam by Friday

 

 

 

Here is the course outline:

1. Course introduction, academic expectations, critical reading

Feb 11

We will introduce the topics of this course along with the academic expectations, both for students and professor. We will explore the connection between critical reading and effective writing and set up the reading groups that will convene for discussion throughout the course.

2. The Writing Process and Methods

Feb 15 2:45pm .. 4:45pm

We will break down the parts of the writing process and examine each part, critiquing examples and looking ahead to various assignments as they will encounter them at AAU. We will preview the various methods we will explore in this course and discuss the writing assignments.

3. Narration and Sentence structure

Feb 22

We will hold a reading group discussion on The Lottery exploring the story critically and making connections to our experience Diving deeper into using good stories and illustrations in your writing, we will use our personal narratives to compile strategies of effective narrative writing. We will begin to cover grammar in the context of your writing and focus in this session on sentence structure and verbs.

4. Example & Professional Language

Mar 1 2:45pm .. 4:45pm

With our special guest from AAU Career Services we will discuss how to write an effective cover letter and the use of examples in professional writing. For much of your college career, academic writing will seek to instill professionalism and we will practice identifying unprofessional, or overly colloquial language, in our communication.

5. Compare and Contrast; sentence variety and parallelism

Mar 8 2:45pm .. 4:45pm

We will take time to discuss De Botton’s essay as an example of compare and contrast writing method. In-class workshop on compare and contrast composition will involve peer critique and feedback. We will discuss the many applications of compare and contrast in academic writing and evaluate our own use of sentence variety and parallelism.

6. The Research Process; formulating a topic and research question, using library resources, getting...

Mar 12 2:45pm .. 4:45pm

Explanation and demonstration of the research process from generating a topic, narrowing a focus, finding sources, evaluating sources, organizing and structuring an argument.

7. Classification; Literature reviews (scholarly sources)

Mar 16 2:45pm .. 4:45pm

Discussion and application of classification as a writing approach and build a basic understanding of literature reviews and the structure of research articles. We will cover how to evaluate and use research articles as support for reasoning in a persuasive research paper.

8. Definition; Revision and Editing

Mar 29 2:45pm .. 4:45pm

We will discuss and share our writing on the use of definition in the short essays on privilege. Continuing our unit on revision and editing, we will focus on thesis clarification, supporting with evidence and research paper structure.

9. Cause and Effect

Apr 12 2:45pm .. 4:45pm

We will use Havel’s letter to understand cause and effect composition. Our reading group will discuss this important letter in 20th Century Czech history and why it was significant in galvanizing an underground audience. We will also discuss and share our writing on the use of definition in the short essays on privilege. We will evaluate our outlines for the research paper and the revision and editing process.

10. Argument and Persuasion I

Apr 19 2:45pm .. 4:45pm

Together we will analyze written and oral arguments and discuss the core principles and properties of argument. We will cover critical thinking questions about the conclusion, reasons, and assumptions of arguments. The argumentative essays we will critique focus on privacy and technology.

11. Argument and Persuasion II

Apr 26 2:45pm .. 4:45pm

In this session we will focus on research-based arguments and the practice of counter-argumentation as a method of persuasion. We will explore the question, “How do you challenge someone’s thinking or change their mind about an issue?”

12. Logical fallacies

May 3 2:45pm .. 4:45pm

We will cover critical thinking questions about the conclusion, reasons, and assumptions of arguments and some of the most common logical fallacies and how they show up in human discourse. We will discuss the common logical fallacies including Ad Hominem, straw person, false dilemma, emotional appeals, appeal to authority, and slippery slope.

13. Putting the Methods Together

May 10 2:45pm .. 4:45pm

Examining sample essays that combine the methods we have been applying, we will discuss the nuances of audience analysis and combining methods. Using in-class writing prompts, we will apply multiple methods to various writing situations and scenarios.

14. Final Exam

May 17 2:45pm .. 3:45pm

The final exam will be essay and short answer. A study guide will be provided in subsequent classes for student to review and prepare.

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