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2021 Spring

FOLKLORE AND MYTHOLOGY - HSS310/HUM510 Spring 2021


Course
Andrew Giarelli
For information about registration please contact our admissions.

Folklore — the oral traditions of a people — informs the arts, politics, and many other areas of human endeavor. Its study is truly interdisciplinary, involving anthropology, history, literature, music, sociology, and the arts. This course will introduce students to a wide range of oral, customary and material folklore genres, and to folkloristics, the study of folklore.

Folklore and Mythology

Course code: HSS 310/HUM 510

Semester and year: Spring 2021

Day and time: Wednesdays 18:30-21:15

Instructor: Andrew L. Giarelli, Ph.D.

Instructor contact: Andrew.giarelli@aauni.edu

Consultation hours: Tuesdays 12:00-14:00 online in Microsoft Teams

 

Credits US/ECTS

3/6

Level

Advanced

Length

15 Sessions

Pre-requisite

TOEFL iBT 71 (undergrad) /TOEFL iBT 80 (grad)

Contact hours

42 hours

Course type

HSC req/el, PS el, JC el, VA el, CEA

1.   Course Description

Folklore — the oral traditions of a people — informs the arts, politics, and many other areas of human endeavor. Its study is truly interdisciplinary, involving anthropology, history, literature, music, sociology, and the arts. This course will introduce students to a wide range of oral, customary and material folklore genres, and to folkloristics, the study of folklore.Quote the Catalog’s description first (available also on www.aauni.edu). You are not allowed to change the description. If you wish to extend the description, place your text after the given one.

 

2.   Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand the definitions, categories and subcategories of folklore.
  • Identify and classify an example of folklore using the terminology and classifications of folklore study (also called “folkloristics”).
  • Use the various indices and scholarly journals in the field of folklore study.
  • Critically examine popular conceptions regarding folklore and folklore study’s own assumptions during its long history.
  • Engage in focused discussion of folklore and folklore scholarship.
  • Make connections between folklore and other fields, including ethnic and nationalism studies.
  • Use a variety of scholarly research sources, including primary materials collected by folklorists, to formulate a thesis and support it in a folklore research paper.

 

 

3.   Reading Material

Required Materials

There is no textbook. All required reading, viewing and listening assignments are on the NEO course site in “Resources” or “Lessons” and listed below. They include items from classic folklore collections, folklore indices, scholarly studies of folklore, and documentary audio/video. Additional required graduate student readings are included here and also listed separately in the course calendar for each date.

All:

  • The Homeric Hymns and Homerica with an English Translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White. Homeric Hymns. Cambridge, MA.,Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1914. Avaialble on Crane, Gregory F. (ed.). “Perseus Collection Greek and Roman Materials.” Perseus Project, 2014.
  • Hervararkviða – The Waking of Agantýr.” Tr. Lee M. Hollander (1936). Voluspa.org. http://www.voluspa.org/hervararkvida.htm
  • “Voluspá – The Prophecy of the Seeress.” Tr. Henry Adams Bellows (1936). Voluspa.org. http://www.voluspa.org/voluspa.htm
  • “The Race Between Toad and Donkey.” In Abrahams, Roger. Afro-American Folktales. N.Y.: Pantheon, 1985.
  • Armistead, Samuel G. and Silverman, Joseph H. “The Judeo-Spanish Ballad Tradition.” Oral Tradition, 2:2-3 (1987): 633-44
  • Ashliman, D.L. “Folklore and Mythology Electronic Texts.” University of Pittsburgh. 1996-2014. http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts.html. “Hansel and Gretel”, “Rumpelstiltskin”, “Cinderella” (multiple versions); “The Hand From the Grave.”
  • Bogoras, Waldemar. Tales of Yugakhir, Lamut, and Russianized Natives of Eastern Siberia. Anthropological Papers of the Museum of Natural History Vol. XX, Part I. New York: Trustees of the Museum of Natural History, 1918. Chapter III: “Kolyma Tales: Raven Tale,” 45-48.
  • Brunvand, Jan Harold. The Study of American Folklore: An Introduction. New York: Norton, 1998 (1968).
  • Child, Francis James. The English and Scottish Popular Ballads. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1904 (1884). Internet Library Open Archive. URL: https://openlibrary.org/books/OL13499113M/English_and_Scottish_popular_ballads
  • Dorson, Richard, Buying the Wind. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1972, pp. 190-ff., “The Crying Stair Well.”
  • Dundes, Alan. Bloody Mary in the Mirror: A Ritual Reflection of Pre-Pubescent Anxiety Western Folklore 57:2/3 (Spring/Summer 1998), 119-35.
  • Dundes, Alan., & Bronner, Simon. J. (2007). The meaning of folklore: The Analytical Essays of Alan Dundes. “Madness in Method Plus a Plea for Projective Inversion in Myth,” 343-51. Logan: Utah State University Press.
  • Erdoes, Richard and Ortiz, Alfonso. American Indian Myths and Legends. New York: Panthon, 1984. Selected tales.
  • Finnegan, Ruth. Oral Literature in Africa. Chapter 14, “Proverbs,” I-IV, 379-405. Cambridge, UK: Open Book Publishers, 2012.
  • Genesis, Books 1-3. In “A Hebrew-English Bible According to the Masoretic Text.” Mechom-Mamre. 2005. URL: http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0.htm.
  • Hesiod, Theogony, Book 1. In The Homeric Hymns and Homerica with an English Translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White. Theogony. Cambridge, MA.:Harvard University Press; London: William Heinemann Ltd., 1914. Available at The Perseus Project. URL: http://data.perseus.org/texts/urn:cts:greekLit:tlg0020.tlg001.perseus-eng1
  • León-Portilla, Miguel. Pre-Columbian Literatures of Mexico, Chapter 1, “Myths In Pre-Columbian Poetry.” 30-59. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, 1986.
  • Mark, Joshua L. “Enuma Elish – The Babylonian Epic of Creation – Full Text.” Ancient History Encyclopedia, 2009-2021. URL: https://www.ancient.eu/article/225/enuma-elish---the-babylonian-epic-of-creation---fu/
  • Morford, Mark P.O., Robert J. Lenardon and Michael Sham. “Classical Mythology.” Oxford University Press USA. 2013. “Student Resources.” http://global.oup.com/us/companion.websites/9780195397703/student/materials/
  • Ovid, Metamorphoses, Book 1.S. Kline (tr.), Poetry In Translation.com. URL: https://www.poetryintranslation.com/klineasovid.php.
  • Rand, Harry. “Who Was Rumpelstiltskin?” The International Journal of Psychoanalysis 81 (2000): 943-62.
  • Taylor, Archer. “The Riddle.” California Folklore Quarterly 2:2 (Apr. 1943), 129-47.
  • Thompson, Stith. Tales of the North American Indians. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1929. Chapter I, “Mythological Stories,” VII: “Raven’s Adventures,” 19-24. Available at Internet Sacred Text Archive. URL: https://www.sacred-texts.com/nam/tnai/tnai00.htm.

Graduate:

  • Dundes, Alan and Georges, Robert A. “Toward A Structural Definition of the Riddle.” Journal of American Folklore 76:300 (Apr.-June, 1963), 111-118.
  • Ellis, Larry. “Trickster: Shaman of the Liminal.”Studies in American Indian Literatures Series 2, 5:4 (Winter 1993), 58-68. https://www.jstor.org/stable/20736767
  • Girard, René, Violence and the Sacred. Tr. Patrick Gregory. London, New York: Continuum, 2005 (1988, 1977 Johns Hopkins University Press). Chapter 1, “Sacrifice, ” 1-40.
  • Janeček, Petr. “Bloody Mary or Krvavá Máří? Globalization and Czech Children’s Folklore.” Slovenský Národopis (Slovak Ethnology) 2, 221-243.
  • Lüthi, Max. The European Folktale: Form and Nature. Philadelphia: Institute for Study of Human Issues, 1982. Chapters 1-2: “One-Dimensionality”, “Depthlessness,” 1-23.
  • Propp, Vladimir. The Morphology of the Folktale. Tr. Laurence Scott. Austin: University of Texas Press: 1968 (1958).
  • Segal, Robert A. Theorizing About Myth. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1999. Chapter 6, “Jung On Mythology,”67-97.
  • Tangherlini, Timothy. “It Happened Not Far From Here: A Survey of Legend Theory and Characterization.” Western Folklore 49:4 (Oct. 1990), 371-390.
  • Taylor, Archer. “Problems in the Study of Proverbs.” The Journal of American Folklore 47:183 (Jan.-Mar. 1934), 1-21.
  • Zipes, Jack. “Spinning with Fate: Rumpelstiltskin and the Decline of Female Productivity.” Western Folklore 52:1 (Jan. 1993), 43-60.

 

 

Recommended Materials

I shall give handouts in many classes for additional recommended further reading on that lecture’s topic.

  • Heidel, Alexander. The Babylonian Genesis: The Story of Creation, 2nd Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1952 (1941). Chapter I, “Enuma Elish,”1-61. https://oi.uchicago.edu/sites/oi.uchicago.edu/files/uploads/shared/docs/misc_genesis.pdf
  • Thompson, Stith. Motif-Index of Folk-Literature: A Classification of Narrative Elements in Folktales, Ballads, Myths, Fables, Mediaeval Romances, Exempla, Fabliaux, Jest-Books, and Local Legends. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1955-1958.
  • Uther, Hans-Jörg. The Types of International Folktales: A Classification and Bibliography. Based on the System of Antti Aarne and Stith Parts I-III, FFC 284, 285, 286. Helsinki: Suomalainen Tiedeakatemia (Academia Scientiarum Fennica). First printing 2004. Second printing 2011.

 

 

 

4.   Teaching methodology

I shall lecture and ask questions of individual students about the assignments and seek out questions from the class as I lecture. Also, you are expected to actively discuss the readings.

 

5.   Course Schedule

Date

Class Agenda

Session 1

Feb. 8

Topic: Introducing Folklore: Definitions and Methods of Study

Description: How do folklorists define folklore? How do they collect, classify, and analyze it?

Reading: In class: excerpts from Brunvand, The Study of American Folklore.

Assignments/deadlines:

Session 2

Feb. 15

Topic: Ancient Near Eastern Creation Myths

Description: Ancient tablets containing some of the world’s earliest recorded tales, discovered in the 19th century, sparked a controversy over the origins of Judeo-Christian myth. Also, a leading folklorist suggests ways to consider such myths today.

Reading (all):

1)   Mark, Joshua L. Enuma Elish – The Babylonian Epic of Creation. Read and listen along.

2)   Genesis, Books 1-3 (in Hebrew-English Bible)

3)   Dundes, “Madness in Method.”

Reading (Optional: some information from this reading will form part of lecture and will be required knowledge on exams): Heidel, Alexander, The Babylonian Genesis, Chapter 1, “Enuma Elish,” 1-61.

Assignments/deadlines:

Session 3

Feb. 22

Topic: Ancient Greek and Roman Myths I

Description: Titanic Clashes.

Reading:

1)   Hesiod, Theogony, Book 1 (ll. 1-1020 in The Perseus Project online text).

2)   Morford, Mark P.O., Robert J. Lenardon and Michael Sham. Oxford Classical Mythology, “Student Resources,” Chapters 3 and 4 (only read main page summary and “Commentary” page for each).

Assignments/deadlines:

Session 4

March 1

Topic: Ancient Greek and Roman Myths II

Description: Horny Deities, Hapless Humans

Reading:

1)   “Hymn To Demeter” (Homeric Hymn 2).

2)   “Hymn To Aphrodite” (Homeric Hymn 5).

3)   Ovid, Metamorphoses, Book 1.

Assignments/deadlines: Early Term Reading Quiz posted on NEO, due on NEO Friday, March 5, 11:59 p.m.

Session 5

March 8

Topic: Norse Myths

Description: Visions of Doom: Seeresses, Trickster Gods, Berserks

Reading:

1)   “Voluspá – The Prophecy of the Seeress.”

2)   Hervararkviða – The Waking of Agantýr.”

Reading (grad): Segal, Robert A. Theorizing About Myth, Chap. 6: “Jung On Mythology,”67-97.

Session 6

March 15

 Topic: Ancient Mesoamerican Myths: The Indebted Ones

Description: An examination of Náhuatl and other ancient Mesoamerican  myth, including justifications for human sacrifice.

Reading (all): León-Portilla, Pre-Columbian Literatures of Mexico. Chapter 1, “Myths in Pre-Columbian Poetry,” 30-48.

Reading (grad): Girard, René. Violence and the Sacred, Chap. 1: “Sacrifice”, 1-40.

Assignments/deadlines:

Session 7

March 24

Topic: Northwest Native North American Myths.

Description: Tales of creators, tricksters and culture heroes.

Reading (all):

1)   Erdoes, Richard and Ortiz, Alfonso. American Indian Myths and Legends. “Creation of the Animal People” (Okanagan), 14-15; “How Men and Women Got Together” (Blood-Piegan), 41-45; “Pushing Up The Sky” (Snohomish), 95-97; “People Brought In A Basket” (Modoc), 109-111; “Creation of the Yakima World” (Yakima), 117-18; “Walks-All-Over-The-Sky” (Tsimshian), 136-39; “Playing A Trick on the Moon” (Snoqualmie), 168-69; “Coyote Places the Stars” (Wasco), 171-72.

2)   Thompson, Stith. Tales of the North American Indians.” “Raven’s Adventures” (Tsimshian), 19-24.

3)   Bogoras, Waldemar. Tales of Yugakhir, Lamut, and Russianized Natives of Eastern Siberia. “Raven Tale,”45-48.

Reading (grad): Ellis, Larry. “Trickster: Shaman of the Liminal.” Studies in American Indian Literatures Series 2, 5:4 (Winter 1993), 58-68. https://www.jstor.org/stable/20736767

Assignments/deadlines:

Session 8

March 31

Topic: Mid-Term Exam Review, Catch-Up (if needed)

Description: We’ll spend the first half of class reviewing for the Midterm exam and catching up on any missed material.

Reading: No new reading.

Assignments/deadlines: Midterm exam will be posted on NEO after review, due on NEO Sunday, April 4 at 11:59 p.m.

 

April 7

No Class: Easter/Midterm Break

Session 9

April 14

Topic: Folktales: Narratives of Magic and Cunning I

Description: Meaning and structure in folktales.

Reading (all): “The Race Between Toad and Donkey,” “Hansel and Gretel” (multiple versions) in Ashliman, D.L. “Folklore and Mythology Electronic Texts.” http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts.html.

Reading (grad): Max Lüthi, The European Folktale: Form and Nature, Chapters 1-2 “One-Dimensionality”, “Depthlessness,” pp. 1-23.

Session 10

April 21

Topic: Folktales: Narratives of Magic and Cunning II

Description: Meaning and structure in folktales.

Reading (all):

1)   Rumpelstiltskin”, “Cinderella,” “The Robber Bridegroom” (all multiple versions) in Ashliman, D.L. “Folklore and Mythology Electronic Texts.” http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/folktexts.html.

2)   “Vladimir Propp’s 31 Key Functions from Russian Fairy Tales” on NEO.

3)   Rand, Harry. “Who Was Rumpelstiltskin?”

Reading (grad):

4)   Propp, Vladimir. The Morphology of the Folktale. Tr. Laurence Scott. Austin: University of Texas Press: 1968 (1958). “Introduction to the 2nd Edition”, Chapter II: “The Method and Material”.

5)   Zipes, Jack. “Spinning with Fate: Rumpelstiltskin and the Decline of Female Productivity”

Assignments/deadlines:

Session 11

April 28

Topic: Folktales (same readings continued from previous session)

Session 12

May 5

Topic: Legends and Superstitions

Description: We’ll examine a European place legend, an Appalachian ghost legend, and a contemporary teenagers’ legend-superstition as a way of defining this elusive folklore genre.

Reading (all):

1)   Ashliman, “The Hand from the Grave”

2)   Dorson, “The Crying Stair Well.”

3)   Dundes, Alan. “Bloody Mary in the Mirror: A Ritual Reflection of Pre-Pubescent Anxiety.” Western Folklore 57:2/3 (Spring/Summer 1998), 119-35.

Reading (Grad):

1)   Tangherlini, “It Happened Not Far from Here: A Survey of Legend Theory and Characterization.”

Assignments/deadlines: Folktales and Legends Reading Quiz Posted on NEO, due on NEO Monday, May 10 at 11:59 p.m.

Session 13

May 12

 Topic: Ballads

Description: An examination of a range of European, British and American ballads, which are a musical form of narrative oral folklore.

Reading:

       Child, Francis James. The English and Scottish Popular Ballads.

a) “Tam Lin: 39A”, 66-69. In Tam Lin Balladry. http://tam-lin.org/versions/39A.html

b) "James Harris" (The Demon Lover/House Carpenter). In Sacred Texts. https://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/child/ch243.htm

Listening:

Multiple Versions of “Tam Lin,” ”James Harris/The Daemon Lover/The House Carpenter,” “The Butcher Boy/The Railroad Boy,” “Banks of the Ohio,” “Fair Fannie Moore,” “Omie Wise,” “Pearl Bryan,” “The Star of Bannock,” “Frankie and Albert (Frankie and Johnny).

 

Assignments/deadlines:

Session 14

May 19

Topic: Final Exam Review and Catch-Up

Description: We’ll spend the first half of class reviewing for the final exam and catching up on any missed material.

Assignments/deadlines:

1)   Final exam: posted on the NEO site at end of class, May 19 and due on NEO at 11:59 p.m. Friday, May 21.

2)   Research paper: due on NEO by 11:59 p.m. Sunday, May 23.

6.   Course Requirements and Assessment (with estimated workloads)

Assignment

Workload (average)

Weight in Final Grade

Evaluated Course Specific Learning Outcomes

Evaluated Institutional Learning Outcomes*

Attendance and Class Participation

42

20%

Display understanding of key concepts, share ideas and make arguments based on folklore data and scholarly theories, meaningfully critique fellow students’ ideas.

2,3

Mid-Term Exam

25

20%

Display knowledge of folklore concepts and apply them to specific case studies from first half of semester.

 

1,2

Research Paper

45

30%

Ability to participate in the scholarly discourse on folklore by properly using primary and secondary scholarly sources in a clearly written paper.

1,2,3

Final Exam

38

30%

Display knowledge of folklore concepts and apply them to specific case studies.

1,2

TOTAL

150

100%

 

 

*1 = Critical Thinking; 2 = Effective Communication; 3 = Effective and Responsible Action

7.   Detailed description of the assignments

Assignment 1: Midterm exam. The exam will consist of s series of short answers designed to test knowledge of key folklore terms as well as content of primary materials, and also 1-2 short essay questions designed to test ability to apply concepts to primary material.

 

Assessment breakdown

Assessed area

Percentage

Factual material

60%

Essay(s)

40%

 

 

 

 

 

Assignment 2: Research paper. Choose a significant folklore research topic, critically read and analyze both primary sources and scholarly secondary sources, develop a thesis regarding that folklore and explore it in depth in writing. You must use peer-reviewed scholarly secondary sources; exclusive use of popular Internet sources will get a C or lower. Make sure you have access to a library database. Minimum word count (excluding bibliography): undergraduates 2000 words; graduate students 3000 words.

 

Assessment breakdown

Assessed area

Percentage

Use of primary texts a well as ability to identify and correctly use scholarly secondary sources to organize, analyze and present folklore.

60%

Clear, grammatically correct writing appropriate to a scholarly paper.

40%

 

 

Assignment 3. Final exam. Final exam: The final exam will consist of factual questions esigned to test your mastery of the full semester’s material covered, plus 2-3 questions requiring 600-800 word essays each, designed to test ability to apply concepts to primary material.

Assessment breakdown

Assessed area

Percentage

Factual material

60%

Essays

40%

 

 

8.   General Requirements and School Policies

General requirements

All coursework is governed by AAU’s academic rules. Students are expected to be familiar with the academic rules available in the Codex and Student Handbook and to maintain the highest standards of honesty and academic integrity in their work.

Electronic communication and submission

The university and instructors shall only use students’ university email address for communication. It is strongly recommended that any email communication between students and instructors take place in NEO LMS.

Each e-mail sent to an instructor that is about a new topic (meaning not a reply to an original email) shall have a new and clearly stated subject and shall have the course code in the subject, for example: “COM101-1 Mid-term Exam. Question”.

All electronic submissions are carried out through NEO LMS. No substantial pieces of writing (especially take home exams and essays) can be submitted outside of NEO LMS.

Attendance

Attendance, i.e., presence in class in real-time, is expected and encouraged. However, the requirement that students miss not more than 35% of real-time classes is temporarily suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Absence excuse and make-up options

Should a student be absent from classes for relevant reasons (illness, serious family matters), s/he can submit to the Dean of Students an Absence Excuse Request Form supplemented with documents providing reasons for the absence. These must be submitted within one week of the absence. If possible, it is recommended the instructor be informed of the absence in advance. Should a student be absent during the add/drop period due to a change in registration this will be an excused absence if s/he submits an Absence Excuse Request Form along with the finalized add/drop form.

Students whose absence has been excused by the Dean of Students are entitled to make up assignments and exams provided their nature allows. Assignments missed due to unexcused absences which cannot be made up, may result in a decreased or failing grade as specified in the syllabus.

 Students are responsible for contacting their instructor within one week of the date the absence was excused to arrange for make-up options.

Late work: No late submissions will be accepted – please follow the deadlines.

Electronic devices

Electronic devices (phones, tablets, laptops…) may be used only for class-related activities (taking notes, looking up related information, etc.). Any other use will result in the student being marked absent and/or being expelled from the class. No electronic devices may be used during tests or exams.

Eating is not allowed during classes.

Cheating and disruptive behavior

If a student engages in disruptive or other conduct unsuitable for a classroom environment of an institution of learning, the instructor may require the student to withdraw from the room for the duration of the activity or for the day and shall report the behavior to the Dean.

Students engaging in behavior which is suggestive of cheating (e.g. whispering or passing notes) will, at a minimum, be warned. In the case of continued misbehavior the student will be expelled from the exam and the exam will be marked as failed.

Plagiarism and Academic Tutoring Center

Plagiarism is “the unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one’s own original work.” (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2nd Edition, Random House, New York, 1993)

Turnitin’s White Paper ‘The Plagiarism Spectrum’ (available at http://go.turnitin.com/paper/plagiarism-spectrum) identifies 10 types of plagiarism ordered from most to least severe:

  1. CLONE: An act of submitting another’s work, word-for-word, as one’s own.
  2. CTRL-C: A written piece that contains significant portions of text from a single source without alterations.
  3. FIND–REPLACE: The act of changing key words and phrases but retaining the essential content of the source in a paper.
  4. REMIX: An act of paraphrasing from other sources and making the content fit together seamlessly.
  5. RECYCLE: The act of borrowing generously from one’s own previous work without citation; To self-plagiarize.
  6. HYBRID: The act of combining perfectly cited sources with copied passages—without citation—in one paper.
  7. MASHUP: A paper that represents a mix of copied material from several different sources without proper citation.
  8. 404 ERROR: A written piece that includes citations to non-existent or inaccurate information about sources
  9. AGGREGATOR: The “Aggregator” includes proper citation, but the paper contains almost no original work.
  10. RE-TWEET: This paper includes proper citation, but relies too closely on the text’s original wording and/or structure.

 

As the minimum policy the types of plagiarism from 1 through 8 results in the failing grade from the assignment and must be reported to the Dean. The Dean may initiate a disciplinary procedure pursuant to the Academic Codex. Allegations of bought papers and intentional or consistent plagiarism always entail disciplinary hearing and may result in expulsion from AAU.

If unsure about technical aspects of writing, students are encouraged to consult their papers with the tutors of the AAU Academic Tutoring Center. For more information and/or to book a tutor, please contact the ATC at: http://atc.simplybook.me/sheduler/manage/event/1/.

Students with disabilities

Students with disabilities are asked to contact their instructor as soon as possible to discuss reasonable accommodation.

9.   Grading Scale

Letter Grade

Percentage*

Description

A

95 – 100

Excellent performance. The student has shown originality and displayed an exceptional grasp of the material and a deep analytical understanding of the subject.

A–

90 – 94

B+

87 – 89

Good performance. The student has mastered the material, understands the subject well and has shown some originality of thought and/or considerable effort.

B

83 – 86

B–

80 – 82

C+

77 – 79

Fair performance. The student has acquired an acceptable understanding of the material and essential subject matter of the course, but has not succeeded in translating this understanding into consistently creative or original work.

C

73 – 76

C–

70 – 72

D+

65 – 69

Poor. The student has shown some understanding of the material and subject matter covered during the course. The student’s work, however, has not shown enough effort or understanding to allow for a passing grade in School Required Courses. It does qualify as a passing mark for the General College Courses and Electives.

D

60 – 64

F

0 – 59

Fail. The student has not succeeded in mastering the subject matter covered in the course.

* Decimals should be rounded to the nearest whole number.

Prepared by: Andrew Giarelli

Date: Jan. 22, 2021

 

Approved by:

Date:

 

Here is the course outline:

1. Week 1: What's Folklore?

2. Week 2: Ancient Near Eastern Myths

3. Week 3: Ancient Greek and Roman Myths I

4. Week 4: Ancient Greek and Roman Myths II

5. Week 5: Norse Myth

6. Week 6: Ancient Mesoamerican Myths

7. Weeks 7-8: Northwest Native American Myths

8. Week 10: Folktales I

9. Week 11: Folktales II

10. Week 12: Legends and Superstitions

11. Week 13: Ballads

12. Week 14: Proverbs and Riddles

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