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2021 Spring

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS - MKT202 Spring 2021


Course
Joel Imhoof
For information about registration please contact our admissions.

Course code: MKT 202/1
Semester and year: Spring 2020
Day and time: Mondays 11.30 a.m. – 2.15 p.m.

Lecturer: Sylvia Vondráčková, MBA.
Lecturer contacts:
E-mail: sylvia.vondrackova@aauni.edu
Phone: +420-739-247-097 (if you text me, include your name and class)
Consultation hours: Upon request half an hour before the beginning of class. Appointments must be confirmed by SMS with your course instructor.

Marketing Communications

 

Course code: MKT 202

Semester and year:  Spring 2020
Day and time: Monday, 11:30am-2:15pm

Instructor: Sylvia Vondráčková, MBA.
Instructor contacts:

E-mail: sylvia.vondrackova@aauni.edu

Phone: +420-739-247-097 (if you text me, include your name and class)

Consultation hours: half an hour before the beginning of class.

 

Credits US/ECTS

3/6

Level

Introductory

Length

15 weeks

Pre-requisite

MKT 248

Contact hours

42 hours

Course type

Bachelor Required

1.   Course Description

The course will thoroughly guide students to initially understand what the specific marketing objectives certain organizations plan to achieve are and how the different promotional tools and communication channels can be utilized in order to successfully achieve them. The initial question then as to WHY such objectives should be attained is then followed by WHICH media and promotional tools are adequate to be combined. Consumer Behavior and the Core Marketing strategy of segmentation, targeting, differentiation, and positioning will be briefly discussed in order to further grasp which media tools are appropriate. The concept of Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC) will be discussed and applied. Both traditional and non-traditional media channels will be identified including their advantages and disadvantages.

 

After having discussed what is to be achieved through marketing communications, the later part of the semester will be dedicated to HOW marketing communications are created and applied in reality. Individual and group projects based on current case studies allow the students to create real Creative Briefs and a Communication Plan for a real company and its assigned marketing objective(s). Emphasis will be placed on comprehending theoretical concepts as well as applying creativity to truly encompass all the elements related to Marketing Communications. Lastly, the latest trends in media, consumer behavior and marketing will be discussed as well as the social implications these all have on society.  After this course, students should be able to identify a marketing objective and create a sound Communication Plan integrating the latest trends.

2.   Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify different marketing objectives and how they may be achieved through the correct mixture of Communication channels and Promotional tools
  • Comprehend and apply strong strategic frameworks within which to make appropriate IMC decisions
  • Comprehend and have a clear understanding of Traditional and Modern Mass Media and their role today
  • Understand the concepts and theories of Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC) strategy so that strategy and concept go hand-in-hand with tactics and implementation
  • Apply the ability to find solutions to a variety of media problems; analytical skills
  • Design an IMC plan for a specific brand, including a tactical offer
  • Implement an IMC Strategy using a brief template and across media from on-line to off-line
  • Gain a workable knowledge of implementing a Media Plan and Communication
  • Be able to apply specific tools and approaches to common marketing communications challenges

3.   Reading Material

Required Materials (Available in the Library or to Download)

  • Main Textbook: Lynne Eagle, Stephan Dahl, Barbara Czrnecka, Jenny Lloyd, MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS, Routledge, 2015
  • George E. Belch, Michael A. Belch, Advertising and Promotion, An Integrated Marketing Communications Perspective, 6th edition, McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2003 - (the complete version is uploaded on our class site)
  • Dave Fleet, Strategic Communications Planning – Your comprehensive guide to effective strategic corporate communications planning 2008, (DaveFleet.com),
    this free e-book, available at: http://davefleet.com/2008/08/strategic-communications-planning-a-free-ebook/
  • Handouts in digital format distributed via the course Website

Recommended web sites worth reviewing:

Additional research sources:

  • ABI/INFORM Global
  • LexisNexis Academic
  • Factiva (good for articles)
  • Business Monitor Online
  • Market Insight (Standard and Poor’s Industry Survey)
  • Mintel
  • Datamonitor
  • MRI
  • Consumer Expenditure Survey (http://www.bls.gov/cex/)

4.   Teaching Methodology

The course will be taught in a very interactive manner using current issues and having students analyze case studies, present a specific IMC plan for a chosen product or service, learn specific experiences from guest speakers and possibly attend a class trip to a marketing related event or company in order to make the subject as relevant and comprehensible as possible. Active participation in class discussions is highly supported and mandatory since training communication skills is a crucial aspect of the real marketing world. Certain projects will be in groups since almost all real media and marketing communication projects are coordinated in teams as well. Using computers and telephones during class is highly forbidden unless used for class purposes and specified by teacher.

5.   Course Schedule

Date

Class Agenda

Feb. 10th

No class – Make-up session is Friday, Feb.28th

Lesson 1

Feb. 17th

Topic: Course introduction, assignments, and organizational matters

Description: Why is Marketing Communication important. Which marketing objectives can be achieved through proper Communication through media and promotional tools? 

Reading: Advertising and Promotion, An Integrated Marketing Communications Perspective, 6th edition, McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2003 – Ch. 1

Lesson 2

Feb. 24th

Topic:  Introducing communication

Description:  What is communication, how does it work, messages, noise as disrupters, AIDA concept, and buyer readiness stages.

Deadline: CW2: Individual ''What's Newz" presentation. PPT slides & speaker’s notes (.DOC file) (digital only). Due on NEO (upload) by Midnight, 2nd March 2020. Name:____________________

Reading: Marketing Communications, Routledge, 2015 - Ch. 1

Lesson 3

Feb. 28th – Friday – make-up session

Topic:  Integrated Marketing Communication (IMC)

Description: What is IMC, its significance and why is it difficult to measure.  The main promotional tools (Advertising, Direct marketing, Personal Sales, Public Relations and Sales Promotion) will be briefly discussed.

In-class IMC plotting activity.

Deadline: CW2: Individual ''What's Newz" presentation. PPT slides & speaker’s notes (.DOC file) (digital only). Due on NEO (upload) by Midnight, 9th March 2020. Name:____________________

Reading: scanned reading and Marketing Communications, Routledge, 2015 - Ch. 4 and Ch. 7

Lesson 4

March 2nd

 

Quiz No. 1

Topic: The Core Marketing Process

Description: WHAT are market segmentation, targeting, differentiation, and positioning (STDP) and HOW do they relate to Marketing Communications. (Another initial step before a proper Integrated Marketing Communications plan can be pre-planned.)

Deadline: CW2: Individual ''What's Newz" presentation. PPT slides & speaker’s notes (.DOC file) (digital only). Due on NEO (upload) by Midnight, 16th April 2020. Name:____________________

Reading: scanned reading - Advertising and Promotion, An Integrated Marketing Communications Perspective, 6th edition, McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2003 – Ch. 2

Lesson 5

March 9th

Topic: Different Media types - Traditional media

Description: Media choices, media strengths and weaknesses, simultaneous media use, media context.

Deadline: CW2: Individual ''What's Newz" presentation. PPT slides & speaker’s notes (.DOC file) (digital only). Due on NEO (upload) by Midnight, 23rd April 2020. Name:____________________

Reading: Marketing Communications, Routledge, 2015 - Ch. 8

Lesson 6

March 16th

Topic: Non-traditional media types - GUEST SPEAKER will be confirmed.

Description: Media choices in online advertising, e-commerce, mobile advertising, Viral marketing, Hybrid media, experiential marketing, measuring effectiveness and ROI. Review for midterm.

Deadline: CW2: Individual ''What's Newz" presentation. PPT slides & speaker’s notes (.DOC file) (digital only). Due on NEO (upload) by Midnight, 30th April 2020. Name:____________________

Reading: Marketing Communications, Routledge, 2015 - Ch. 9

Lesson 7

March 23rd

Marketing Communication in Czechoslovakia and the Czech Republic – highlights from 1918 -2020

Reading uploaded on NEO.

Lesson 8 March 30th

E1: Midterm exam

 

April 6th

Midterm break – no class

April 13th

No class – State holiday

Lesson 9

April 20th

Field Trip – details to be specified 2 weeks beforehand

 

Lesson 10

April 27th

Topic: Creativity and their tactics, Creative Brief – What is consumer insight

Description: What is creativity, challenges and pitfalls of creativity, developing creative messages in Media, How to write a Creative Brief

Deadline: CW2: Individual ''What's Newz" presentation. PPT slides & speaker’s notes (.DOC file) (digital only). Due on NEO (upload) by Midnight, 7th May 2020. Name:____________________

Reading: Marketing Communications, Routledge, 2015 - Ch. 5 and uploaded links on NEO related to how to write a Creative Brief

Lesson 11

May 4th

Topic: Media Planning, Evaluation and Control: evidence of effectiveness and the challenge of measuring return on investment

Description: Defining marketing effectiveness and return on investment. The value of evaluation concerns and challenges associated with measuring IMC effectiveness and ROI

Deadline 1: CW2: Individual ''What's Newz" presentation. PPT slides & speaker’s notes (.DOC file) (digital only). Due on NEO (upload) by Midnight, 14th May 2020. Name:____________________

Reading: Marketing Communications, Routledge, 2015 - Ch. 16

Deadline 2: CW3: Creative Brief. Print version brought to class for the in-class contest. Digital version uploaded on NEO by Midnight, May 19th, 2020.

Lesson 12

May 11th

Topic:  GIMC, Global integrated marketing communications, International Marketing Comm. strategies. Conversion funnel.

Description: WHAT is GIMC, what are international marketing communication strategies. Case study with KRAFT in China.  

Deadline 1: CW2: Individual ''What's Newz" presentation. PPT slides & speaker’s notes (.DOC file) (digital only). Due on NEO (upload) by Midnight, 21st May 2020. Name:____________________

Deadline 1: CW4 Final Project draft hand-in No. 1

Reading: Scanned on NEO

Lesson 13

May 18th

Topic: Overall semester wrap-upNeuromarketing. Creative brief contents

Description: Neuromarketing, last class discussion and summary of what we had learnt together. Group feedback for final project.

Deadline: CW2: Individual ''What's Newz" presentation. PPT slides & speaker’s notes (.DOC file) (digital only). Due on NEO (upload) by Midnight, 28th May 2020. Name:____________________

Deadline 2: CW4 Final Project draft hand-in No. 2        

Deadline 3: Creative brief printed to class and uploaded on NEO

Lesson 14

May 25th

 

Final project presentations in group – PPT presentation and 2 printed copies of final project brought to class

 

The lecturer tries to arrange a guest speaker per each semester and the date of this speaker will be set at least 2 weeks in advance. 

6.   Course Requirements and Assessment (with estimated workloads)

Assignment

Work-

load (average)

Weight in Final Grade

Evaluated Student Learning Outcomes

Evaluated Institutional Learning Outcomes*

Attendance

42 hrs.

-

-

 

CP: Class participation and preparation

13 hrs.

15%

Students need to participate in discussions and express their thoughts and opinions. Preparation is critical and phones and PCs are restricted.  50% is for class participation and 50% is for not using phones or PCs in class.

 

 

CW1: Assign. 1: Integrated Marketing Communications Campaign Analysis

20 hrs.

15%

Comprehend and have a clear understanding of Traditional and Modern Mass Media and their role today based on specific finding pertaining to a chosen organization.

Core Advertising Strategy and consumer behavior concepts comprehended by writing a 5-6-page Advertisement Analysis on a specific advertisement each student has chosen. 

1

 

 

Quiz No. 1

8 hrs.

10%

Ability to find solutions to a variety of media problems; analytical skills.

Reading in advance will be necessary.

Part of the quiz is preparing a Communication Brief.

1

 

CW2: Assignment 2: Individual Student Presentations 

20 hrs.

10%

Practice presentation skills, ability to explain the studied topic to peers, apply key marketing and media terms and theories, and demonstrate subject knowledge.

2, 3

E1: Mid-term exam

20 hrs.

20%

Prove through demonstration that discussed theory is correctly understood as well as implemented

1

CW3: Assign. 3 - Preparing a Creative Brief

7 hrs.

10%

Demonstrate creative thinking and apply discussed concepts regarding the communication process 

 

CW4: Assign. 4: Final Class Project – Media Communication Plan for specified organization. 

20 hrs.

20%

Gain a workable knowledge of implementing a Media Plan.

Implement an IMC Strategy using a brief template and cross media from on-line to off-line.

Identify key issues, research, analytical and synthetic skills, subject knowledge, creative thinking, experience teamwork.

1, 2, 3

TOTAL

150 hrs.

100%

 

*1 = Critical Thinking; 2 = Effective Communication; 3 = Effective and Responsible Action

Participation guidelines:

  • Class participation and preparation – the lesson topics need to be studied beforehand from the indicated textbook, so that an in-depth discussion can be held in each class.
  • All students are expected to attend and participate in class. Missing class will seriously affect your grade! However, simply attending every class is not participation.
  • Facebooking, surfing on-line, and texting are not considered active participation and is the fastest way to earn 0 points.
  • Expect your course leader to keep track of how often you participate by actively responding to questions, asking questions yourself, and engaging in class discussions to help earn your participation grade. If you are not sure, please ask your course leader what you can do to increase your participation grade.
  • For further participation guidelines, please see the course NEO e-learning site.
  • Any or all of the following will IMMEDIATELY reduce your participation grade by 10% for each occasion:
  1. Arriving late for, or leaving early, a class. Leaving a class apart from hourly breaks.
  2. Continually talking. (This means talking for longer than a few seconds.)
  3. Reading non-course related material, e.g. newspapers and magazines, or online, e.g., Facebook, during class.
  4. Any breach of the Electronics Policy, below.
  5. Any other action which another student may reasonably find distracting during class.

 

Electronics Policy. PDAs and mobile / cell phones are not allowed to be used during class. Notebook / Tablet PCs may be used, in class, for notetaking ONLY; notes may be checked at any time. This policy facilitates class engagement and participation. All mobile / cell phones must be turned off. If your phone rings during class, you will be asked to leave the classroom.

 

Assignments. All assignments will be evaluated for clarity of writing, critical analysis of the issues, proper use of references to support positions taken, quality and diversity of sources, and extent to which the assignment meets the requirements specified. 

  • See below for the detailed Course Assignment Grading Criteria.
  • Remember: It is important to answer all aspects of the assignments.

For ALL assignments, as per university regulations, five academically respectable correctly cited sources is the minimum expected. Any assignments NOT meeting this standard will NOT be graded.

 

  • Written assignments must, as a minimum, include a cover sheet, table of contents, abstract / executive summary, introduction, conclusion / summary, and bibliography / works cited, as separate pages. The main body of the paper should include a header (title of course, term and name of student) and footer (date and page number). The paper should have normal margins (1” on all sides), be single-sided, 1.5-spaced, 12-point font, Times New Roman. Failure to meet ANY of the above requirements will result in the assignment not being graded.
  • Creativity is to be demonstrated in the content of your paper. Your work should reflect your understanding of the material. An emphasis on synthesis and critical thinking rather than simply “reporting” is expected.
  • For the group assignment, a Group Self-Assessment form (see handout, available on the class course space on the Google Apps Website) MUST be completed by each member of the group. Failure to do so will result in the assignment not being graded.
  • Your presentation must also include a cover ‘page’, a list of contents, an introduction explaining what is to come and why it is important, a conclusion / summary, and bibliography / works cited at the end of the presentation, all as separate slides.
  • Your presentation slide master must include a header (title of course, term and name of student) and footer (date and page number).
  • All sources are to be written in an academic style using appropriate in-line citation (preferably, Harvard formatting: author, year, page number). Information on proper Harvard citation is available as a link on the class course space in Google Sites.
  • Each presentation will be graded on your understanding of the topic; plus, relevant data use, clarity, organization, time management, graphics, etc.
  • Email Protocol: When sending emails to your course leader:
  1. Students must identify in the subject line which course they are in and the main point of the message, e.g. Subject Line: MKT202-1: Question on Exam.
  2. DO NOT resend emails with a previous subject listed that is unrelated to the content of current email. They will be deleted and not
  • Document Naming: For all documents submitted electronically the file name must include the following:

                     Course Number

                     Assignment Number

                     Your Last Name

                        Example:  MKT202-1_CW1_Smith.doc

  • For all hard copies submitted Student Name, Course# and Assignment No. should be clearly visible on the first page.

7.   Detailed Description of the Assignments and Assessment Breakdown

  • CW1: Assignment 1: Individual IMC Analysis report: Each student will choose a specific advertisement that he or she will closely analyze by specifying the presumed target group, positioning and other core media and marketing theory concepts. All assumptions must be adequately justified. Length 5-6 pages, without cover page.

 

Assessment breakdown

Assessed area

Percentage

Report content (no grammatical, spelling, structure errors) and analysis including advertising / marketing terminology usage

50%

Clarity and justified thoughts as well as report structure (has TITLE, INTRODUCTION, CONCLUSION, AND WORKS CITED)

50%

Total

100

 

  • CW2: Assignment 2: Individual student presentationsWhat’s New?

Each class will begin with “What’s New,” an opportunity to present and discuss current issues and new innovations in marketing and media communication. Each student will sign up for a presentation date and will lead a 10 min. discussion on the topic of his/her choice, which must relate in some way to marketing communication. The goal is to engage, educate, and entertain your audience. In addition to presenting the issue, you will lead a short discussion.

 

Assessment breakdown

Assessed area

Percentage

Written presentation (no grammatical, spelling, structure errors; has TITLE, INTRODUCTION, CONCLUSION, AND WORKS CITED)

40%

Presentation

40%

Overall quality of work and effort

20%

Total

100%

 

  • CW3: Assignment 3: Individual Creative Brief

Each student will prepare a Creative Brief, a 2-page summary of the mandatory elements the client wishes and which the agency departments should fulfill.  It is like a blueprint with information that should guide the different agency departments in creating a complex and consistent campaign utilizing the different promotional tools and media options.

 

Assessment breakdown

Assessed area

Percentage

Written presentation (no grammatical, spelling, structure errors; has TITLE, INTRODUCTION, CONCLUSION, AND WORKS CITED)

40%

Presentation and includes unique and useful Consumer Insight

40%

Overall quality of work and effort

20%

Total

100%

 

 

  • CW4: Assignment 4: Final Group Project – Communication Plan Proposal and Presentation for specified organization – An initial marketing objective will be identified to be achieved through the Communication Plan. Based upon the correct chosen target group a positioning and differentiation strategy is presented through a variety of combined media and promotional tools. Both theory needs to be applied as well as creativity in order to demonstrate all the concepts discussed during the semester. A written version is to be submitted and, as well, each group will present their findings in a 15-25-minute presentation at the end of the semester. All group members will also assess each other’s effort (using the Group Self-Assessment form).

 

Assessment breakdown

Assessed area

Percentage

Written Communication Plan (no grammatical, spelling, structure errors; has TITLE, INTRODUCTION, CONCLUSION, AND WORKS CITED)

40%

PowerPoint presentation (no grammatical, spelling, structure errors; has TITLE, INTRODUCTION, CONCLUSION, AND WORKS CITED)

40%

Overall quality of work and effort

20%

Total

100%

 

8.   General Requirements and School Policies

General requirements

All coursework is governed by AAU’s academic rules. Students are expected to be familiar with the academic rules available in the Codex and Student Handbook and to maintain the highest standards of honesty and academic integrity in their work.

Not knowing the rules, misunderstanding the rules, running out of time, submitting the wrong draft, or being overwhelmed with multiple demands are not acceptable excuses. There are no excuses for failure to uphold academic integrity.

Quality of Written Assignments

All written assignments, including in-class quizzes, exams, exercises, assigned papers etc., must be written at an acceptable university English level of quality. This means students must proofread exams, assignments, papers, etc. and make sure that they are free of grammatical, spelling, sentence structure and other errors.  Papers with a high level of errors of this type (meaning more than one per page) will be graded down substantially.

This means students must take responsibility for the overall quality of the work they submit.

For students who need assistance with writing skills, the school offers the Academic Tutoring Center (ATC). Students who are unsure of their writing abilities should work with the ATC's writing lab before assignments are due. All assignments with a significant writing component are given in enough time for students to work with the writing lab before submitting work.

Electronic communication and submission

The university and instructors shall only use students’ university email address for communication. It is strongly recommended that any email communication between students and instructors take place in NEO LMS.

Each e-mail sent to an instructor that is about a new topic (meaning not a reply to an original email) shall have a new and clearly stated subject and shall have the course code in the subject, for example: “MKT202-1 Mid-term Exam. Question”.

All electronic submissions are carried out through NEO LMS. No substantial pieces of writing (especially take-home exams and essays) can be submitted outside of NEO LMS.

Attendance

Attendance is required. Students who are absent 35 percent of classes [i.e. 5 times or more] will be failed (or administratively withdrawn from the course if most absences are excused). Students might also be marked absent if they miss a significant part of a class (by arriving late or leaving early) as specified in the syllabus. Therefore, any student who has missed five classes of this course will be asked to WITHDRAW. Should they fail to WITHDRAW from the course they will be FAILED.

Absence excuse and make-up options

Should a student be absent from classes for relevant reasons (illness, serious family matters), s/he must submit to the Dean of Students an Absence Excuse Request Form supplemented with documents providing reasons for the absence. The form and documents must be submitted within one week of the absence. If possible, it is recommended the instructor be informed of the absence in advance. Should a student be absent during the add/drop period due to a change in registration this will be an excused absence if s/he submits an Absence Excuse Request Form along with the finalized add/drop form.

Assignments missed due to unexcused absences cannot be made up which may result in a decreased or failing grade as specified in the syllabus.

Students whose absence has been excused by the Dean of Students are entitled to make up assignments and exams provided their nature allows for a make-up. Students are responsible for contacting their instructor within one week of the date the absence was excused to arrange for make-up options.

Late work: No late submissions will be accepted – please, follow the deadlines.

Electronic devices

  • Mobile phones must be turned off during classes and placed on floor or in bag. No calling or texting during class meetings (wait until the break).
  • Laptops and Tablets may NOT be used during class time unless approved by course leader. They should be placed in a case or bag. Excessive use of phones and computers in class means the student will be marked as absent.

Eating is not allowed during classes.

Cheating and disruptive behavior

If a student engages in disruptive or other conduct unsuitable for a classroom environment of an institution of learning, the instructor may require the student to withdraw from the room for the duration of the activity or for the day and shall report the behavior to the Dean.

Students engaging in behavior which is suggestive of cheating (e.g. whispering or passing notes) will, at a minimum, be warned. In the case of continued misbehavior, the student will be expelled from the exam and the exam will be marked as failed.

Plagiarism and Academic Tutoring Center

Plagiarism is “the unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one’s own original work.” (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2nd Edition, Random House, New York, 1993)

Turnitin’s White Paper ‘The Plagiarism Spectrum’ (available at http://go.turnitin.com/paper/plagiarism-spectrum) identifies 10 types of plagiarism ordered from most to least severe:

  1. CLONE: An act of submitting another’s work, word-for-word, as one’s own.
  2. CTRL-C: A written piece that contains significant portions of text from a single source without alterations.
  3. FIND–REPLACE: The act of changing key words and phrases but retaining the essential content of the source in a paper.
  4. REMIX: An act of paraphrasing from other sources and making the content fit together seamlessly.
  5. RECYCLE: The act of borrowing generously from one’s own previous work without citation; to self-plagiarize.
  6. HYBRID: The act of combining perfectly cited sources with copied passages—without citation—in one paper.
  7. MASHUP: A paper that represents a mix of copied material from several different sources without proper citation.
  8. 404 ERROR: A written piece that includes citations to non-existent or inaccurate information about sources
  9. AGGREGATOR: The “Aggregator” includes proper citation, but the paper contains almost no original work.
  10. RE-TWEET: This paper includes proper citation but relies too closely on the text’s original wording and/or structure.

 

As the minimum policy, the types of plagiarism from 1 through 8 result in a failing grade for the assignment and must be reported to the Dean. The Dean may initiate a disciplinary procedure pursuant to the Academic Codex. Allegations of bought papers and intentional or consistent plagiarism always entail disciplinary hearing and may result in expulsion from AAU.

If unsure about technical aspects of writing, students are encouraged to consult their papers with the tutors of the AAU Academic Tutoring Center (ATC). For more information and/or to book a tutor, please contact the ATC at: http://atc.simplybook.me/sheduler/manage/event/1/.

Students with disabilities

Students with disabilities are asked to contact their instructor as soon as possible to discuss reasonable accommodation.

9.   Grading Scale

Letter Grade

Percentage*

Description

A

95 – 100

Excellent performance. The student has shown originality and displayed an exceptional grasp of the material and a deep analytical understanding of the subject.

A–

90 – 94

B+

87 – 89

Good performance. The student has mastered the material, understands the subject well and has shown some originality of thought and/or considerable effort.

B

83 – 86

B–

80 – 82

C+

77 – 79

Fair performance. The student has acquired an acceptable understanding of the material and essential subject matter of the course but has not succeeded in translating this understanding into consistently creative or original work.

C

73 – 76

C–

70 – 72

D+

65 – 69

Poor. The student has shown some understanding of the material and subject matter covered during the course. The student’s work, however, has not shown enough effort or understanding to allow for a passing grade in School Required Courses. It does qualify as a passing mark for the General College Courses and Electives.

D

60 – 64

F

0 – 59

Fail. The student has not succeeded in mastering the subject matter covered in the course.

* Decimals should be rounded to the nearest whole number.

Prepared by and when: Sylvia Vondráčková, M.B.A., 25th December 2019

Approved by:

Chris Shallow BA MSc, Chair of Department of Marketing, 5th January 2020;

Karen Grunow-Hårsta, Ph.D., Dean of School of Business Administration, January 30th, 2020.

 

Here is the course outline:

1. Intro Marketing Communications

Feb 08

WHY is Mkt Comm. important. Which marketing objectives can be achieved through proper comm. through medi and promotional tools.

2. The Communication Process

Feb 15

The Communication Process

3. Integrated Marketing Communication

Feb 22

What is IMC? Why is it important and difficult to meausre? What are the main Promotional tools and their examples?

4. Core Marketing Strategy

Mar 01

Core Marketing strategy - STPD concept

5. Traditional Media

Mar 08

Traditional Media

6. A Mix of Concepts

Mar 15

Consumer Behavior trends, Buyer Readiness stages, the Communication process

7. Study Guide and Review for Midterm

Mar 22

Lets make sure we all know what is expected in the Midterm coming up next week.

8. Midterm Exam

Mar 29

you can do it!

9. Creating a Creative Brief

Apr 12

Creating a Creative Brief

10. Creating the Message

Apr 19

Creating the Message

11. Media Planning and Buying

Apr 26

Media Planning and Buying

12. Societal implications

May 03

Societal implications

13. Neuromarketing

May 10

Neuromarketing

14. Final Assignment Presentations

May 17

15. ADDITIONAL - Guerilla Marketing

Guerilla Marketing

16. ADDITIONAL - Midterm study guide

Midterm study guide

17. ADDITIONAL- Quiz No. 1 Study Guide

Quiz No. 1 Study Guide

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